Vortex Eudaimonia : productive joyful life
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navigation, contact, access: click ►▼, link & ••• — March 10, 2018
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how to contact us
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Leif Smith
303-778-0880
Explorers Foundation, Inc.
PO Box 9100
Denver, CO 80209
USA
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leifsmith@gmail.comImportant: If we are not already in email communication, please put “*****” at the beginning of the Subject: line of your email. This will assure that we don’t miss the first email you send to us.
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Explorers Foundation ••• home page
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efBegin ••• top level for all outlines
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Vortices ••• - a list, with explanations
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Threads •••, traces of conversations
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Glyphs ••• (a list of fragments of Freeorder)
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Investments ••• a table of all investments
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freeorder ••• the concept & vision
 
explorersfoundation.org/eudaimonia.html — a vortex is a region of Explorers Foundation research and investment — 🔹 indicates a recent addition
 
Eudaimonia (Greek: εὐδαιμονία) is a classical Greek word commonly translated as 'happiness'. Etymologically, it consists of the word "eu" ("good" or "well being") and "daimōn" ("spirit" or "minor deity", used by extension to mean one's lot or fortune). Although popular usage of the term happiness refers to a state of mind, related to joy or pleasure, eudaimonia rarely has such connotations, and the less subjective "human flourishing" is often preferred as a translation. —Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudaimonia
 
This vortex deals with these ideas as they apply to individuals, and also to their extension into the work of groups in every kind of venture or network collaboration. Good life depends not only on what you take into yourself, but also on what you choose to allow to surround yourself, including organizations that provide opportunity to employ your abilities, and providers of governance services.
 
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Recent changes & additions
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21Sep17: Two new books by Peter Saint-André; Yasuhiko Genku Kimura’s translation of Tao Teh Ching; Bill Casey’s recommendation of a new translation of Meditations, Marcus Aurelius
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01Jul17: Tom Butler-Bowdon’s list; Unboxed, a new blog
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14Mar17: Victim, Rescuer, Persecutor triangle, article recommended by Celestine McMahan-Woneis
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07Feb17: Brains on Purpose - Stephanie West-Allen
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07Feb17: article from the Foundation for a Mindful Society
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05Feb17: Simone de Beauvoir
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To be added:
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Sean Gabb’s work on Stoicism
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Bill Casey’s post on Stoicism
 
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🔹Songs of Zarathustra: Poetic Perspectives on Nietzsche's Philosophy of Life ••• by Peter Saint-Andre •••
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“Although Friedrich Nietzsche is best known for his thunderous pronouncements about the death of god and the will to power, hidden within his writings is also a wealth of practical wisdom. Songs of Zarathustra condenses the heart of Nietzsche's ideas into a cycle of original poems, along with new translations of some of Nietzsche's own verse (marked with an asterisk). Ordered chronologically from The Birth of Tragedy (1872) through Ecce Homo (1888), these poems track Nietzsche's growth as a thinker and writer. Above all, Songs of Zarathustra presents a fresh, positive perspective on Nietzsche's philosophy and its applications to living a full human life.” —Peter
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🔹Servant Leadership, Isabel Lopez •••
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Peter Saint-Andre: Epicurian Dialogue, Tao of Roark, Thoreau, Monadnock Press
saint-andre-thoreau-covers
The Upland Farm, Thoreau on Cultivating a Better Life •••
Seasons of Thoreau: Reflections on Life and Nature ••• selected by Peter Saint-Andre
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Letters on Happiness: An Epicurean Dialogue, by Peter Saint-Andre
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The best life is a happy life, and a happy life is easy to achieve: all you need is to understand what is natural and needful for human beings (such as health, serenity, and companionship), and to avoid destructive emotions like anger and envy along with groundless desires for fame, power, honor, wealth, and immortality.
So argued the Greek philosopher Epicurus. Although he lived over 2300 years ago, the ideas and practices that Epicurus recommended are still compelling today. Letters on Happiness explores Epicureanism through a modern, down-to-earth dialogue between two young friends (and includes all-new translations of key Epicurean texts). Their extended conversation peels away the layers of misunderstanding about Epicurus that have accumulated over the centuries (e.g., that he advocated an unthinking hedonism), revealing the positive wisdom that lies at the core of this ancient creed.
As Epicurus himself observed: "Reflect on what brings happiness, because if you have that you have everything, but if not you will do everything to attain it." Letters on Happiness provides essential insights for the love of wisdom and the practice of a better life.
The book will always be available for free on this [see below -ls] website. Kindle and print versions can be purchased at Amazon.
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An Epicurean Dialogue on Happiness •••, by Peter Saint-Andre
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The Tao of Roark •••, by Peter Saint-Andre
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Translations of Epicurus by Peter Saint-Andre
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Letter to Menoeceus, by Epicurus — Peter Saint-André's translation, in progress •••
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The Principal Doctrines, by Epicurus •••
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"I’ve finished a draft of my final Epicurus translation: his Letter to Menoeceus. Now that I’ve rendered just about all of his ethical writings from Greek into English, I plan to weave them together with commentary into a short book entitled Epicurus on Happiness. Stay tuned for details." —from Peter's blog, One Small Voice •••
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The Monadnock Press & Monadnock Review (1997-2002) •••
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The Monadnock Press is an online publisher of public-domain texts that reflect our vision of human potential, with a special focus on the literature of freedom and the classics of Western civilization, the Anglosphere, and America.
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The Monadnock Review was a webzine of art and ideas dedicated joy and reason and meaning, published from 1997 to 2002 •••
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The Book of Balance ••• (Paraview Publishing), a new (2004) translation of Tao Teh Ching,, by Yasuhiko Genku Kimura.
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“… Yasuhiko Genku Kimura’s new translation of the ancient Tao Teh Ching is…as clear and readable as can be wished for. On every page the reader will encounter that special and exciting glow found only when an author truly loves his subject….It deserves to be read widely.“ -- from the Foreword by Herbert Guenther, Ph.D., D. Litt., author of The Matrix of Mystery and From Reductionism to Creativity
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🔹Bill Casey ••• (Executive Leadership Group) recommends a new translation of Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations, The Essential Marcus Aurelius •••, by Jacob Needleman and John Piazza.
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Tom Butler-Bowdon’s ••• list ••• of 50 Self-Help Classics
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The story ••• of Tom’s 50 Classics series
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Unboxed •••, a blog on issues that impact our lives
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“There are more things twixt heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.” 
From “Hamlet” by William Shakespeare.
It is our intention to blog on issues that impact our lives. Some will be serious, others on a lighter note. Where there is conflict, we believe that there are advantages to being open to the exchange of ideas, to shifting perspectives, and exploring alternatives that are agreeable to all sides. We are strengthened as a nation when we shift from conflict to harmony.
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Brains on Purpose ••• — Neuroscience, conflict resolution, and much more, presented by Sephanie West Allen •••
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Authenticity — two interesting approaches
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“The Three Faces of Victim – An Overview of the Drama Triangle” ••• by Lynne Forrest, recommended by Celestine McMahan-Woneis
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Simone de Beauvoir: happiness is not only possible, but is our moral obligation
“De Beauvoir, who lived through two World Wars, devoted much of her work to the notion that happiness is not only possible but our moral obligation — a notion rooted not in a rosy wishfulness but in an incisive intellect that used every tool of skepticism to probe untruth and dispel ignorance.” —from “Simone de Beauvoir on Atheism, the Ultimate Frontier of Hope, and the Need to Move Beyond the Simplistic Divide of Optimism and Pessimism” ••• (brainpickings, a thoughtful curator of good ideas)
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Foundation for a Mindful Society •••
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“Find Happiness by Embracing All of Your Emotions” •••. How the pursuit of happiness can hinder certain aspects of well-being—like building resilience when we experience setbacks. … Why the direct pursuit of happiness may not be a good idea.
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This is why I have used the concept of resonance as a kind of ultimate end for explorers rather than happiness. See “Weavers of Freeorder” ••• -ls
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Stoicism ••• (the work of Travis Hume), recommended by Bill Casey, Executive Leadership Group •••
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Two articles about the ideas of J.R.R. Tolkien recommended by Mark Frazier.
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“Against the Cult of Travel,” about hobbits and Tolkien, by Brett and Kate McKay, May 31, 2016
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“How J.R.R. Tolkien Found Mordor on the Western Front,” by Joseph Loconte, June 30, 2916, The New York Times
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Samuel Smiles, Self-Help, 1882 ••• (Lawrence Reed, in "The Freeman" Oct 2011); the book ••• (Gutenberg)
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Modern History Sourcebook: Samuel Smiles: Self Help, 1882 ••• (Fordham University)
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"The object of the book briefly is, to re-inculcate these old-fashioned but wholesome lessons-which perhaps cannot be too often urged, that youth must work in order to enjoy,-that nothing creditable can be accomplished without application and diligence,-that the student must not be daunted by difficulties, but conquer them by patience and perseverance,-and that, above all, he must seek elevation of character, without which capacity is worthless and worldly success is naught. If the author has not succeeded in illustrating these lessons, he can only say that he has failed in his object."
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As a Man Thinketh •••, by James Allen, 1903 recommended by Ricardo Valenzuela
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The aphorism, "As a man thinketh in his heart so is he," not only embraces the whole of a man's being, but is so comprehensive as to reach out to every condition and circumstance of his life. A man is literally what he thinks, his character being the complete sum of all his thoughts.’ —James Allen
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Lara Ewing, Ewing & Associates •••
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“In less turbulent times, your organization could get by with good, commonsense management. Current market conditions require optimal performance to survive, and exceptional leadership to thrive. You can’t afford to work around the blockages and waste precious talent on ineffective structure, careless strategy or less-than-complete leadership alignment.
“We remove blockages, build synergy and unleash your organization’s pent-up resources to clarify direction and drive forward movement to growth and extraordinary performance.”
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Fran Burgess, fORGE, and NLP Kitchen
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fORGE embraces the philosophy of Constructivism, operating on the fundamental presuppositions: ‘We create our own Reality’ and ‘We have all the resources we need’, in line with the range of operating principles devised by the UKCP (United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy) Constructivist College in 2010. •••
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The NLP Kitchen, “Who We Are” •••
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Description of Burgess’ work: http://www.globalgurus.org/nlp/nlpgurus30.php
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Yasuhiko Kimura, Vision in Action •••
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Jan Prince, speaker, NLP trainer
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Robert Dilts ••• (NLP University)
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Description of Dilt’s work: http://www.globalgurus.org/nlp/nlpgurus30.php
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Bill Casey & Wendi Peck, Executive Leadership Group •••
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Two excellent articles: "When Failure Leads to Innovation, and When It Doesn’t" — the quest for error and making the best use of it when found is a key principle advocated by Explorers Foundation. Ideas such as these are proving useful to one of Executive Leadership's principal clients, the U. S. Navy. Both articles are on the ELG blog •••
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Meg Biddle, Cartoonist •••
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Meg Biddle, "Portait of the Artist As A Young Girl" (near the top of this page)
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Youth Arts Collective, Monterey, California, a sanctuary and workspace for creative youth •••
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Truth & Beauty ••• (a cartoon)
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Meg Biddle's website •••
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Pat Wagner, speaker, writer — leadership, effective management, supervision ••• (Sieralearn)
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Sieralearn is the principle project of Pattern Research, Inc. for now (2016).
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Pat’s programs and consulting work are covered in the Sieralearn website:
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Three programs done for The American Library Leadership & Management Association (LLAMA), a division of The American Library Association (ALA) •••
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“The Executive-Decision Maker’s Secret Weapon – How You Can Make Better Choices with the Use of Graphic Models”
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"The increased speed of change, along with new and shifting user expectations, and political and financial pressures, make decision-making more difficult, even for seasoned library leaders. Simple visual models can help capture useful (and sometimes slippery) data, better communicate issues to stakeholders, and earn trust and respect through transparency. Learn two time-tested models from the negotiation community, which can be applied and shared in many situations."
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“Learn the Supervisor’s Balancing Act – How You Can Bring Out the Best in Your Top People Without Micromanagement”
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"Library leaders might hesitate, with justification, to interfere with the work of top managers. After all, didn’t you promote, hire, or retain people with the experience and breadth of vision to run departments and buildings without micromanagement? However, even top managers have issues. Are they coordinating their efforts with their administrative team members? Are they consistently working within the parameters and priorities of the strategic plan? Are they modeling the best behaviors of civility and customer services? Are they growing their skills and changing along with the people they supervise? It is not that top managers don’t need supervision; it that the scope and direction is different."
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“Make Your Library Dreams Come True – How to Use Project Management Techniques to Write a Strategic Plan”
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"Why does a library’s strategic plan often fail? Because your overarching and ambitious abstract vision might not translate well into goals and priorities that make sense to the people who will be doing the day-to-day work. The secret is to use project management principles while creating the plan, including accountability and what is often called management overhead. Building in time and resources for operations–communication and trouble-shooting–at the beginning can ensure that the work gets done on time, under budget, at an agreed upon level of quality, and with everyone still speaking to each other."
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Michael Strong, FLOW •••
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The life of Ghiberti, his Bronze Doors ***
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Peter McLaughlin (requiescat in pace), The McLaughlin Company — better energy, effectiveness, laughter, team-building
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Peter was the inspiration for this page. He was one of the best men I have known, a source of happiness and inspiration for many. -ls
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“Most people will agree that Peter J. McLaughlin was one of the most amazing, charismatic, wine-loving, joke-telling, exercise-doing persons of all time. He loved great literature, great music, and great Bordeaux, but most of all, he loved to spin a good tale and share a laugh with family and friends.” -written by Peter’s children, Denver Post, November 13-14, 2015
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Positive Psychology in Business
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Peter McLaughlin was part of a vanguard group in the new field of Positive Psychology**
studying the role of positive emotions in business, such as optimism, zest, resilience, and gratitude. The research is clear: positive emotions help you live longer, have better health, work more productively, and make more money.
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**The field Positive Psychology was spearheaded by Peter’s colleagues Martin Seligman, Ph.D., of the University of Pennsylvania; and Chris Peterson, Ph.D., University of Michigan.
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Emergenetics ••• — the art of balancing brain styles to make good teams (suggested by Peter, who used Emergenetics to guide his interviews for his (so far, Oct16) not published) book on brain styles of effective people.
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Emergenetics: Our personalities emerge from our genetics and are further shaped by our ongoing life experiences. Emergenetics is a unique and flexible approach to personality profiling that is based on the latest brain research.
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The Emergenetics color wheel for quick insight into relevant types:
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Peter McLaughlin’s books
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Feedback Revolution, 2013
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Catch Fire, 1997
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Mentally Tough, 1988
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Adventures in Boomerland (a project description, from Peter, probably from 2012 or so)
‘A small group of creative colleagues is developing an exciting program entitled “Adventures in Boomerland.” The program is being roughly targeted to individuals age 46 to 90 - individuals often referred to as “early boomers,” late boomers,” and “pre-boomers.” The purpose of the program? To optimize one's journey through life's Third Age. The age that could well be the most rewarding and exciting time of one's life. To flourish, not languish in the last third of life. The program is seeking people who are unafraid of change; who are insatiable in intellectual curiosity; who are interested in big things and small happinesses. People who intend to “go quietly into the night” need not apply. The program, now in its nascent stages, will consist of hands-on workshops and retreats, web-based seminars, special tutorials, networking experiences, and appropriate products. The objective is to instill a “leaping out of bed” feeling by optimizing participants' strengths rather than dwelling on their weaknesses. It will address the participants' physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual needs.’
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Glyphs
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517 Ghiberti’s lifework — Michael Strong on Ghiberti’s forty-eight years work on two sets of bronze doors — a pattern for living?
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Participants in this vortex
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Meg Biddle, Bill Casey, Jan Prince, Peter Saint-André, Michael Strong, Pat Wagner, Leif Smith, Yasuhiko Kimura, M.L. Hanson, Peter McLaughlin (at sea)
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To be invited: Mark Frazier, Jessica Lipnack, Ben Leichtling, Stephanie West Allen, Olivier Tryba, Fran Burgess, Lara Ewing Himber.
 
.oOo.